Since 1999, deaths by suicide have increased by around 30 percent, with nearly 45,000 died by suicide in 2016 alone

“Anthony Bourdain’s Death Shines Light on the Soaring Rates of Suicide in the U.S.”

(If you or someone you know is considering suicide, please contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255), text “help” to the Crisis Text Line at 741-741 or go to suicidepreventionlifeline.org.

Since 1999, deaths by suicide have increased by around 30 percent, with nearly 45,000 died by suicide in 2016 alone.

“Talking saves lives. Ask if they have had the thought and let them know that it’s not unusual for people that ‘feel like they do or are going through what they are’ to have those thoughts”)

JULIE MAZZIOTTA, People June 08, 2018

Anthony Bourdain — chef, author and television host — was found dead of an apparent suicide on Friday at age 61.

His death comes as suicide rates in the United States are soaring, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control released Thursday.

Since 1999, deaths by suicide have increased by around 30 percent, with nearly 45,000 died by suicide in 2016 alone. And Bourdain’s age group — those between ages 55 to 64 — have the third highest rates of suicide, at 18.71 per every 100,000 Americans.

According to the new report, suicide rates have increased in almost all U.S. states — 44 in total — and across all racial and ethnic groups. In half of the U.S., suicide rates increased by 30 percent or more.

“This is essentially a problem everywhere — a problem that’s getting worse,” Dr. Anne Schuchat, principal deputy director of CDC, said in a press release.

Among the people who’ve died by suicide, many had recently undergone difficult life experiences, from relationship problems, to financial stress, job loss and more. Cases of substance abuse were also common, with 28 percent having trouble with drinking or using drugs in excess.

The best way to help is to reach out to people who may be considering suicide, Dr. Kevin Gilliland, Psy.D., told PEOPLE.

“Talking saves lives. Ask if they have had the thought and let them know that it’s not unusual for people that ‘feel like they do or are going through what they are’ to have those thoughts,” he said. “Most people mention something to friends, physicians, or their religious circle. They may talk about it in passing, give things to other people, or talk about feeling hopeless about their current situation. People closest to the person, family or life-long friends, often know that the person had been struggling.”

Gilliland said that it is a myth that talking to someone who may be struggling about suicide puts the idea in their head. It’s actually best to talk to them about it.

“Ask them if they have had the thought or feeling like it would be better to ‘just not be alive,’ ” he says. “Express empathy for the person and offer to help them get connected to people that can help them with how they are feeling. Help them develop a plan to get help and follow-through with them until they get connected. People often don’t know they are depressed or what’s wrong with them and may need your help getting connected to the appropriate healthcare people that can treat their condition.”

If you or someone you know is considering suicide, please contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255), text “help” to the Crisis Text Line at 741-741 or go to suicidepreventionlifeline.org.

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